This is my brand.

While writing my last post, I skimmed through my Flickr archives, which contains about 10,000 photos. Many have been set as private, not because they’re scandalous, but because a good chunk of them are completely mundane photos that nobody wants to see. I shared some of the more amusing ones with Yann, who remarked that it was strange how I had a vast collection of snapshots of ordinary things such as a cuppa matcha latte, a box of latex gloves, store-bought apple pie, and an out-of-focus photo of a former co-worker eating charred vegetables.

I’m a pioneer of over-sharing on the internet. This behaviour is now openly embraced through apps like Snapchat or Instagram. I was doing something socially acceptable 10 years earlier than most!

Allow me to take you guys on a mundane stroll down memory lane:

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Second impression.

Yesterday, I decided to roam my original neighbourhood of North Park for a rush of nostalgia. Here, I occupied the same building for the entirety of the four or so years I first lived in Victoria (2004-2008). The building was in the early stages of decay: the hardwood floors were so trashed that they’d frequently implant your soles with shards of wood; the rear balcony was missing wooden boards and was on the verge of collapsing; the windows wouldn’t stay open without being propped up by assorted objects (mainly dollar store candle holders).

Do you think my former neighbours had rock art gardens? Oh, no.

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October 27, 2005 Throwback blog post

Preface: Two friends and I set out to make Pruno using this recipe. (There is now a WikiHow for Pruno!) Pruno is a type of alcoholic drink that can be made using just food found in prison.

There was a post about the process dated January 24, 2005, but it’s mainly me complaining about having to peel a lot of oranges. The thrilling post was supposed to come once Pruno was ready (but probably not safe) for consumption.

prisonjuice1

That day did not come, because we forgot about Pruno until I brought it up in a MSN conversation months later. (I’m “bolo throwing champion of 1976”.)

Out of respect for the people no longer in my life, I have edited out their real names.

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October 12, 2006 Throwback blog post

Preface: This post was originally published on 10/12/2006. I was living in Victoria at the time and working as a maid. My early 20s was a constant battle against lecherous weirdos vying for my attention. I’m not sure whether the reason I don’t run into these situations as often anymore is because I’m now in my crusty mid-30s or because I’ve trained myself to flat-out ignore any guy who tries to stop me on the streets. I suspect it’s both.

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Nothing about us without us.

If you follow me on Instagram and follow me closely enough to stay updated on my Stories, you would’ve caught my overview of the shitstorm caused by a popular YouTuber on Sunday.

I’m not going to repeat as much of the details here as I don’t want to direct further attention to this person’s channel.

The story begins with a hearing person with no ties to the deaf community who gained notoriety for her “ASL” videos of songs. The spoken portions of her uploads are often not accompanied by captions thus making them inaccessible to deaf people who rely on them.

That’s not all; she decided to start selling ASL-themed merchandise. At this point, Chrissy Marshall of The Essential Sign and 50+ other members of the Deaf community convened to write an open letter delineating the issues with what this person was doing. The letter was very polite and informative, yet it resulted in posts on Instagram, Twitter and even a new non-captioned video by this person accusing the Deaf community of attacking her.

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The reality of being a successful Millennial.

While I was taking time off work to recuperate from my injury, I got so bored that I dared to sort through my cache of important papers. I’m only partially organized in that everything was dumped in one small box, from my secondary school transcript to a jumble of tax papers from the last decade.

Canadians are only required to keep income tax records from the last six years, so it was time to get rid of some retro government documents.

I was shocked by how little money I made in my mid-20s. In 2008, my employment income was just under $13,500. This was the same year I took a three-week trip to Europe. I remember being told by my mother, “You are so lucky you have the money to travel!  I can’t afford to travel!”

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